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Sparsh Shah —Osteogensis Imperfecta Patient Who is Not Afraid

AUGUST 11, 2016
James Radke, PhD

Follow your dreams and never give up. That is how Sparsh Shah lives. The 13-year-old singer has produced several YouTube videos singing popular American songs (Let it Go, Not Afraid, See You Again), Indian songs (Albela Sajan Ayo Re, Ek Pyar Ka Magma Hai), and original songs (Count On Me).

Below are two clips showing the singing talents of Sparsh.
 

 

 

And Sparsh does this while living with osetogenesis imperfect that confines him to a wheelchair and makes him extremely susceptible to bone fractures. For example, earlier this year Sparsh had to undergo hip surgery due to a fracture that occurred during a trip in Spain. Soon after the surgery however, Sparsh was back singing and performing.

More Sparsh

To see the other songs in Sparsh's repertoire, visit  his YouTube channel.

What is Osteoporosis Imperfecta

Osteogenesis Imperfecta, also known as brittle bone disease, is a congenial bone disorder. People with this disorder have bones that break easily, sometimes for no apparent reason. There are 8 different types of osteogenesis imperfecta that are distinguished by different signs and symptoms. Type 1 is the mildest form of osteogenesis imperfecta and type 2 is the most severe. Other types have signs and symptoms that fall somewhere between these two extremes.
 
Osteogenesis imperfecta affects an estimated 6 to 7 per 100,000 people worldwide.

Symptoms

  • Pain the in bones
  • Bone fractures
  • Blue sclera
  • Hearing loss
  • Bowed legs and arms
  • Kyphosis
  • Scoliosis
  • Hypermobility
  • Flat feet

Treatment

There is no specific treatment or cure for osteogenesis imperfecta. Treatment is directed toward preventing or controlling the symptoms, maximizing independent mobility, and developing optimal bone mass and muscle strength. This may involve physical therapy, bracing, surgery, rodding, and medications to reduce the risk of fractures (ie, bisphosphonates).
 

 

 



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