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Biliary Atresia Patient Jarrius Robertson Had Himself a Day at the NFL Honors Ceremony

FEBRUARY 06, 2017
Andrew Black
You might remember Jarrius Robertson from when he signed his contract with the New Orleans Saints. 4-months later, Jarrius is onto bigger and better things. The 14-year-old suffering from a rare liver disease known as biliary atresia was all over the NFL Honors red carpet, interviewing and meeting football players. More importantly, he got to present an award on stage with his temporary head coach, Saints’ Sean Peyton. 
 
What a night it was for Jarrius. Before his big moment on stage, he got to hang out with some of the NFL’s greatest.
 
Like football legend Dion Sanders

Dolphin’s receiver Jarvis Landry 

Antonio Brown and his funky hairdo 

And even his all-time favorite quarterback, Drew Brees

Before the ceremony began, Jarrius was a little upset that Saints’ Head Coach Sean Payton wasn’t there for their award presentation practice, and during their interview, he let him know. 

As the night went on, the awards began and it was time for Jarrius’ announcement of this year’s NFL Comeback Player of the Year award.

The next day, Jarrius received a flight upgrade on his return trip to New Orleans

Jarrius is still currently fighting biliary atresia, which caused him to undergo 13 surgeries over the course of his life. He is also currently on the waiting list for a liver transplant.

About biliary atresia

Biliary atresia is a life-threatening condition in infants in which the bile ducts inside or outside the liver do not have normal openings.
 
With biliary atresia, bile becomes trapped, builds up, and damages the liver. The damage leads to scarring, loss of liver tissue, and cirrhosis. Cirrhosis is a chronic, or long lasting, liver condition caused by scar tissue and cell damage that makes it hard for the liver to remove toxins from the blood. These toxins build up in the blood and the liver slowly deteriorates and malfunctions. Without treatment, the liver eventually fails and the infant needs a liver transplant to stay alive.
 



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